Foreign students now allow to work in UK after graduation- PM Boris Johnson

 

The British Government has said that international students will henceforth be able to stay and work in the UK after graduating in a policy change that had previously restricted the period to four months.

There will be no cap on the number of students who can apply, as those with student visa will be able to apply to switch to a skilled worker visa if they find a job which meets the relevant criteria. The new policy ends one of ex-Prime Minister Theresa May’s most controversial immigration policies which critics argued would deter international students from applying to British institutions and would lead to the loss of bright students who could contribute to the UK after being educated there.

The Guardian UK added that, from next year, all international graduates could qualify for a two-year period to work in the UK, increasing their chances of finding long-term employment after studying.

“The measure goes further than the Home Office’s latest immigration white paper, which proposed extending the four-month limit to six months and the limit for those with doctorates to a year,” Guardian stated.

It is a return to the policy that was scrapped by the coalition government in 2012 when Theresa May, as then home secretary, said the two-year post-study work visa was “too generous.”

Scottish court rules UK PM Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament is unlawful

Scotland’s highest court of appeal ruled on Wednesday that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament for five weeks is unlawful, the lawmaker who led the challenge, said.

Parliament was prorogued, or suspended on Monday until Oct. 14, a move opponents argued was designed to thwart their attempts to scrutinise his plans for leaving the European Union and allow him to push through a no-deal Brexit.

“We are calling for parliament to be recalled immediately,’’ Scottish National Party lawmaker, Joanna Cherry, told Sky News after the verdict by Scotland’s Inner Court of Session.

There was no immediate comment from Johnson’s office.

On Friday, London’s High Court rejected a similar challenge by campaigners and that case is due to be heard on Sept. 17 at the Supreme Court, the highest judicial body in the United Kingdom.

Jo Maugham, a lawyer involved in the Scottish case, said an appeal to the Supreme Court in their challenge would begin on Tuesday.

-Reuters/NAN